NPR Uses Debunked Studies in Effort to Support Claims that Fracking Harms Health

NPR’s Marketplace published a story on Wednesday suggesting fracking chemicals are harming public health. In an effort to support that narrative, reporter Scott Tong lists a dozen studies he (presumably) feels best support the argument. Most notably, none of the studies listed by MarketPlace prove causation, which is a systemic shortcoming of literature attempting to link fracking to health problems that has been flagged by environmental research group Resources For the Future (RFF). But this is just one of a myriad of flaws shared by each of the studies included Marketplace’s list.
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Another Activist Study Targets Children, Alleges Fracking Health Harms With No Evidence

A few flaws have emerged time and time again in anti-fossil fuel activist studies attempting to link fracking to health problems. And a new report released this week may be the most comprehensive collection of these clichéd shortcomings yet. Not only is this “study” claiming fracking threatens the neurodevelopment of …
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Earthworks Exploits Children in Latest Repackaging of ‘Threat Maps’ Report

For the fourth time in 15 months, Earthworks regurgitated its infamous “Threat Maps” report this week, pitching the debunked misinformation originally released last June as a “new analysis.” So how did this recycled “report” claiming those who live near oil and gas infrastructure face elevated health risks due to air pollution manage to get media coverage in POLITICO and E&E News? By incorporating children into the narrative — a go-to anti-fracking media strategy detailed in a 2012 memo that encouraged “Keep It In the Ground” groups to make connections between health problems and fracking, even when no evidence existed to support the linkage.
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Health 101

Did you know that study after study has found that - thanks to our increased use of natural gas brought about by shale production - air emissions across the United States have plummeted?

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Fracking and Health: Headlines vs. Reality